Indigenous or Blended Model for South Asian Social Work?

Main Article Content

Venkat Rao Pulla
Tulshi Kumar Das
Bala Raju Nikku

Abstract

An argument about indigenous social work education often surfaces in South Asian schools of social work. In this study, central concerns around the indigenous argument, together with a review of the pervasive influence of the western model of social work in Asia is undertaken.


The three author- research team, utilised a methodology that featured a desk review and an analysis of communications with select South Asian scholars and academics that were respondents for the study. Additionally, the authors present their personal reflections, that prudently address their positionality and reflexivity.


The primary finding in this research paper is that the legacy of Western-influenced social work education is thriving within the region, despite criticism from different quarters about its effectiveness. The secondary finding is the admittance by respondent academics in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, India and Nepal that relevant to their societal context, limited adaptations have been introduced and are working in their respective countries. The current research provided an opportunity to research participants to view and summarily reject claims by certain bogies that western influence in social work is solely responsible for lack of cultural appropriation within the curriculum in South Asia.   The study suggests that there is a lot that can take place by way of adaptation without sacrificing the cultural elements while rearranging the social work curriculum within the region. The authors strongly advocate a blended approach as a suitable course of moderation in the re-construction attempts of social work futures in South Asia.  

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PullaV. R., DasT. K., & NikkuB. R. (2020). Indigenous or Blended Model for South Asian Social Work? . Space and Culture, India, 8(1), 40-58. https://doi.org/10.20896/saci.v8i1.773
Section
Special Articles
Author Biography

Tulshi Kumar Das, Professor, Department of Social Work, Shahjalal University of Science & Technology, Sylhet, Bangladesh

Professor of Social Work, Shahjalal University of Science & Technology, Sylhet, Bangladesh

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