Visual Culture, Photography and the Urban: An Interpretive Framework

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Gillian Rose

Abstract

This paper offers a framework for understanding and reflecting upon the various ways that urban scholars have worked with visual representations of city spaces. It suggests that there are three main approaches: representing the urban, evoking the urban and performing the urban. The paper discusses the methodological implications of each of these.

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How to Cite
Rose, G. (2014). Visual Culture, Photography and the Urban: An Interpretive Framework. Space and Culture, India, 2(3), 4-13. https://doi.org/10.20896/saci.v2i3.92
Section
Special Articles
Author Biography

Gillian Rose, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK

Professor, Department of Geography

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